Cape Boerperd Breeders Society Articles and forms

 

 

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Legislation on grooms in Horse Boxes

 

Regulation 330 of the National Road Traffic Regulations deals with towing of vehicles and regulation 330(f) states: “No person shall operate a vehicle on a public road towing another vehicle if the towed vehicle is conveying persons at a speed in excess of 30 kilometres per hour, unless the towed vehicle is a semi-trailer.” 
 
A semi-trailer is “a trailer having no front axle and so designed that at least 15 per cent of its tare is super-imposed on and borne by a vehicle drawing such trailer.”
 
Most horse boxes are nothing much more than a trailer with a roof and perhaps a dual axle, so they therefore you may not convey persons in them unless you drive at speeds below 30km/h at all times. 

 

KAAPSE BOERPERD / CAPE BOERPERD

The Kaapse Boerperd (“Cape Boer Horse”) differs significantly from any other existing horse breed with regard to basic conformation. In 1948, a group of concerned horse breeders felt that the early Kaapse perd faces possible extinction and therefore initiated formal steps to breed and improve this horse breed. The early Cape Horse was universally popular and was one of the first horse breeds to be exported from South Africa to Australia. The Kaapse horse was renowned for its endurance as well as the ability to work hard on a meager diet and still remain in a fairly good condition. The horses had an easy, comfortable gait and could carry a big rider effortlessly over difficult terrain for extended periods.

These and other fine characteristics of the early Kaapse horse prompted breeders to develop a horse breed with the same features and to improve and upgrade the breed at the same time be a pleasurable riding horse with a good temperament. It was considered important that the horse had to be able to hold its own in the show ring.
Attempts were made to identify suitable breeding animals, but because of exports, droughts and other disasters, suitable animals were hard to come by. Stallions were especially rare. It was then decided to make use of stallions of other breeds that conformed to the basic requirements of the breed and which could make a positive contribution in terms of establishing the fledgling breed. Breeds considered in this regard included the Arab, Hackney and Flemish Horse and the American Saddle Horse. The saddle horse were selected because of the fact the Boerperd mares were used as foundation mares in the breeding program of the Saddle horse in South Africa. Stallions of these breeds were used in conjunction with Boerperd stallions to breed foals conforming to all the breed standards.

It was decided that all horses would be subjected to inspection and that those which passed would be entered into a foundation register. Foals born from foundation parents would then, after passing inspection, be entered into an upgrading programme. A stringent selection policy ensured that only desirable animals were allowed to the upgrading programme. Mares became eligible for inspection at two years of age and stallions at three years of age. The Boerperd Herd Book was initially closed in 1964 and no more “foreign” horses were accepted to the breeding programme. The herd Book was, however, re-opened in 1970 for a period of one year. In 1981 the South African Stud Book and Livestock Improvement Associations accepted the affiliation of the Kaapse Boerperd Breeders’ Society and animals with the desired qualities were again accepted into the re-opened Herd Book of F1 animals, after passing inspection.

In 1993 it was realized that the Kaapse Boerperd was beginning to lose its identity. A decision was taken to nominate specific stallions from other breeds to enhance some of the traits of the Kaapse Boerperd. In 1994 eight stallions were nominated and inspected by a specially appointed inspector. The progeny of these stallions were entered into the herd book as F1-animals. The Society followed the normal upgrading programme and no animal was registered without passing an inspection.
In 1999 the Herd Book was closed and no foreign material are permitted.
The Cape Boerperd was declared an indigenous developed breed.

With the long history of registration as a developing breed with horses registered as F1 – F4 Studbook and the Director of Animal improvement suggested that horses will be classified as follows in the future:
Basic herdbook will include all basic stock plus F1 animals of which the father and mother are not known. All F1 animals with parents on record plus offspring of basic herd animals mated to F2 stallions and higher will be registered in Herdbook A. All F2 animals with both parents on record will be registered in herdbook B. All F2 animals and higher with both parents and grandparents on record will be registered in the SP or fully registered section.

The ideal Kaapse Boerperd must be of medium height (between 14,2 and 16 hands), strong without being clumsy and have quality, especially in its legs. As the Kaapse Boerperd is primarily used for arduous and demanding farm work, the horse must be robust, have good endurance and be fast and surefooted. The Kaapse Boerperd should ride comfortably with enough speed in its various gaits. This will ensure that it can also be used as a pleasure horse. Above all, the horse should not tire its rider. It is also important that the Kaapse Boerperd have enough grace and action to hold its own in the show ring, in breeding and in the riding classes.

A Kaapse Boerperd is allowed to display a lot of quality, as well as a fiery posture and action, on condition that it meets the stringent standards of conformation and type. If an animal has an unnatural stretch for a stance, which may hide aspects of its conformation and appearance, it is desirable to let such an animal move around. The Kaapse Boerperd has a proud head and high rolling action. The horse has a good temperament and may be ridden comfortably, but with action, grace and style. The horse does not scare easily and is not excitable. The Kaapse Boerperd has the ability to maintain good condition on a meager diet and adapts to a wide variety of circumstances.

The Kaapse Boerperd is a registered breed with SA Studbook. At present there are about 650 horses on record. The Breed Society and SA Studbook is in the process of updating all records.
All foals from registered parents are registered in the foalbook. At age three these young horses are inspected by a panel of 3 or more inspectors appointed by the Breed Society.
Only about 25% of all registered Cape Boerperd end up in the “Saddleseat” showring. The rest are used for pleasure riding, dressage, jumping etc.

The Cape Boerperd is a multi purpose horse that can be used for work, pleasure and show. The Cape Boerperd is a very versatile horse and it is the aim of the Breeders Society to show the Cape Boerperd in all its diverse forms. We have a “saddle seat” as well as a “standard seat” division at shows. Horses are also exhibited in harness classes as well as in Carriage driving. Cape Boerperd are also used for show jumping, dressage, out rides, endurance riding and game viewing.

Rulebook:
During 1997 a rulebook for the Cape Boerperd was published by the Breeders Society. This book is updated annually and is available in English and Afrikaans. This rulebook is used by judges, breeders etc to learn more about the Kaapse Boerperd.

Website:
The year 2001 saw the start of a website for the Cape Boerperd. www.capeboerperd.co.za Information about the horse itself, the SA Boerperd Amateur union, board members, the youth program, “For Sale” page etc are available on this website.

Cape Boerperd Youth Program (CBYP)

In 2004 the Cape Boerperd Youth program was started.
The youth program of the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society and the SA Boerperd Amateur Union aims to introduce the Cape Boerperd and it’s versatility to all horse loving children. We aim to involve the youth in all aspects of the horse industry. The CBYP is a program for young people with a common interest in horses. CBYP offers a variety of programs and competitions that challenge members to become involved, to learn, and to develop competence in all areas of the horse industry.
While working with the Cape Boerperd, members develop a sense of sportsmanship and fair play, learn citizenship skills, master leadership skills and develop discipline and responsibility for themselves and their horses.
The CBYP is designed to bring out the best in its members - no
matter what their skills and interests

Since the early 1992 regular Boerperd courses are held under the auspices of the Breeders Society and the Amateur Union. Since the early 1900 regular symposiums and judges courses are also presented by these societies.

(SABAU) SA Boerperd Amateur Union
AMATEUR - STATUS

In 1990 a long awaited ideal was realized when the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society initiated a sport organization using the Cape Boerperd as sport horse. In 1990 this organization was allocated Amateur Status by the Dept of Sport and SABAU was formed.
The country is divided into provinces. In each province riders compete at club and regional shows and competitions. From these results provincial teams are selected to compete for the “Pietie Joubert” shield at the South African Boerperd Amateur Championships. A National team is selected on an annual basis to compete against teams from other countries.
The SA Boerperd Amateur Union (SABAU) caters for its members in a lot of different divisions. At present there are a “Saddleseat” division, a “Standard” seat division, “Pleasure” ride and “Carriage” driving division.
Development and advanced training courses are held on a regular basis. SABAU is a fast growing organization with members from all walks of life. SABAU is a member of ESSASA.
PROVINCIAL STRUCTURES
SABAU chairman:
Ezelle Marais



Participation in shows is growing continuously and because of its affordability, the Kaapse Boerperd is enjoying growing popularity.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
Breed Director: Ezelle Marais (+27 42) int. (042 local) 2472296
President: Ezelle Marais
Secretary: Mrs Tania Bosch (+27 42) int. (042 local) 247 2138
                                                    (+27 72) int. (072 local) 709 4224

                                    

Kaapse Boerperd Breeders’ Society of SA
P O Box 55
COOKHOUSE – 5820
Telephone: (+27 42) int. (042 local) 2472296
Facsimile: (+27 86) int. (086 local) 5091959
e-mail: ezelle@capeboerperd.co.za
Website: www.capeboerperd.co.za

DIFFERENT DIVISIONS

The Cape Boerperd is a very versatile horse and it is the aim of the Breeders Society to show the Cape Boerperd in all its diverse forms. We have a “saddle seat” as well as a “standard seat” division at shows. Horses are also exhibited in harness classes.

Classes as well as in Carriage driving. Cape Boerperd are also used for show jumping, out rides, endurance riding and game viewing.

Since 31 December 1999 the register of the Cape Boerperd is closed to “outside” horses. The Kaapse/Cape Boerperd was then declared a developed breed. All foals from registered parent are recorded in the foal register. At the age of 3 years all foals are inspected by a panel of three inspectors before such a horse can be recorded in the Kaapse/Cape Boerperd register.

The Kaapse/Cape Boerperd was also declared a South African breed. This means a breed bred in South Africa for South African conditions. National championships are held annually at the end of February in George.

YOUTH PROGRAM

In 2001 the Breeders Society also started a youth program aimed at promoting the breed with the youth.

How do I go about becoming a Breeder of Cape Boerperd.

1. Become a member of the Cape Boerperd breeders Society. Buy doing this you will also become a member of SA Studbook and receive your stud number and stud name.
2. Get a foal book from the breed society secretary
3. Buy a registered Cape Boerperd mare over the age of 3 years
4. Use or buy a registered Cape Boerperd Stallion
5. Mate the horses when the mare is in season and please remember to keep record of the mating date and the names of the horses mated. If you make use of a stallion belonging to somebody else, make sure you are given a mating certificate.
6. Have your mare tested by a vet to make sure she is pregnant.
7. 11 months later you will hopefully be a healthy foal richer.
8. Fill in the foal’s particulars in the foal book in duplicate.
8 .a Date of birth
b. Sex
c. Name of foal
d. Name of father with his registration number
e. Name of mother with her registration number
f. Markings and color of the foal.
g. Fill in the picture with the color markings as well.
h. Send the top copy of the birth notification to the secretary of the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society at P.O. Box 55, Cookhouse, 5820 If you have used somebody else’s stallion make sure to include the mating certificate.
i. You will get an account for the foal’s registration
j. You will get a foal book registration for your foal on payment of the fees.
k. When your foal is 3 years old it has to be inspected for the adult register of the Cape Boerperd.
l. Apply to the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society for an inspection of your foal.
m. The 3 inspectors will inspect your foal during an inspection tour. If it passes the inspection it will become a registered Cape Boerperd.

Please remember breeding is not for “sissies” so to speak. There is no foolproof way to know that you have mated the right pair of horses. Every foal is an individual and this makes breeding such a demanding and interesting job.

To Contact Us:
Phone: +27 (0) 42 247 2296 / 042 2431722
Fax: +27 (0) 86 5091959
Email: ezelle@capeboerperd.co.za
P.O. Box 55
COOKHOUSE
5850
South Africa

Secretary: Miss Tania Bosch

The Cape Boerperd breeders Society was formed in 1948. A group of horse enthusiasts realized that the horse was fast disappearing in our mechanical age. These people realized how popular the old Cape Horse was throughout the world. The Cape Horse was famous for it’s hardiness, endurance and it’s ability to work hard on minimum feed, yet still maintain condition. It was all these outstanding characteristics that made these people to raise a breed that would display all these characteristics and improve and refined to be ideally suitable for South African conditions. The Cape Boerperd is a multi purpose horse that can be used for work, pleasure and show.


How do I buy and choose the right Cape Boerperd?

We have put together some information to help you through this selection process.

When you start talking about Cape Boerperd, you'll hear one phrase over and over-"This horse can do ANYTHING and EVERYTHING!"

How to buy and choose a Cape Boerperd

First decide what you want and why you want a horse.
The selection and purchase of your Cape Boerperd horse is the first step to an involvement with the Cape Boerperd world that can be one of the most rewarding and enjoyable experiences you will ever have. The information in the next couple of pages will help guide you through the process of selecting and purchasing the Cape Boerperd that is right for you. While these pages will provide you with a lot of answers about selecting and buying your new Cape Boerperd, you will discover many questions for which you will have to find your own answers. The answers to those questions will determine in large measure what Cape Boerperd is right for you. The more diligent you are in asking those questions, and the better you understand the answers, the better the relationship you and your new Cape Boerperd will have.

Become a Member of the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society or the SA Boerperd Amateur Union
The first step in the selection of a Cape Boerperd that will meet your expectations and be capable of delivering the full potential of the Cape Boerperd experience involves some examination of your resources. As a horse owner, you have the obligation to care for your new horse properly. Before you buy a horse, be sure you understand what your responsibilities will be and how they will be carried out. If a Cape Boerperd is to be your first horse, the assistance of experienced Cape Boerperd owners can be invaluable. They can help you assess your needs, resources, and goals to help steer you to the right horse. The Cape Boerperd Breeders Society can provide you with a list of Cape Boerperd owners in your area who will be able to assist you in finding and purchasing your first Cape Boerperd or visit the” For SALE” page and take a look for yourself.

Time
Your enjoyment of Cape Boerperd ownership will significantly improve if, in the very beginning of the process, you closely examine your available resources. Of particular importance is time. How much time can you devote to your Cape Boerperd? How you answer this question will make a tremendous difference to the cost of horse ownership. Do you have time to care for your horse at home? Maintaining a stable at home can be very enjoyable, but it will require a commitment of your time with your horse. It is important to remember that this will be time in addition to the pure recreational time with your Cape Boerperd. If you do not have time to maintain a stable by yourself, you may want to consider paying for some extra help at home, or it may make sense to board your Cape Boerperd at a facility where its routine daily care can be done for you so your time can be used for trail riding, driving, lessons, competitions, etc.

Money
It is often said that buying the horse is the cheapest part. It is unfair to your horse to buy it and then discover your financial resources will not allow you to care for it properly. Annual care and maintenance costs vary greatly depending on many things. A horse turned out to pasture year round will cost considerably less than a youngster in full-time professional training. Horse care costs also vary depending on where you live. Fortunately Cape Boerperd are relatively inexpensive to feed and care for, and are known as “easy keepers.” Ask local horse owners about the costs of various types of horse care in your area. Always remember, a good horse and a bad horse cost the same to care for – make the right choice.

The price of your new Cape Boerperd will vary depending on the horse’s age, breeding, level of training, competitive ability, and overall quality as a representative of the Cape Boerperd breed. . Once you have a clear determination of your specific needs, stick to your selected criteria and, when you find the right Cape Boerperd, be willing to pay just a little bit more if you can. You will not regret it.

Skills
In selecting the right Cape Boerperd, you must assess your own equine skills. If you are already an experienced rider or driver, most likely you have a clear idea about the level of training and ability your new horse already should have. However, if you do not have much horse experience, consider taking some lessons with a professional trainer in order to assess your skill level and make a better determination of the training level your new Cape Boerperd should have to match your skills. While it is an attractive idea to buy a horse to “move up to” in terms of your own skills, it may prove to be very frustrating to own a horse you cannot enjoy because it is too advanced for your skill level. If there is any question, re-examine your choice and reconsider buying a Cape Boerperd more suitable to your present skill level

Will you be selecting a Cape Boerperd that needs further training? Do you have the time and skill to provide this? Novice riders and novice horses do not suit each other, you will only get frustrated. You may need to consider placing your Cape Boerperd in the care of a professional trainer and recognize that it may take some additional time and money for your Cape Boerperd to become ready for you to ride and drive on your own

The Cape Boerperd Standard of Perfection
The Cape Boerperd has a specific written description and graphic illustrations of the ideal type and conformation. Since this is a description of the ideal mature Cape Boerperd, it is best to have an experienced breeder or trainer help you evaluate your selection if you are considering a young, immature Cape Boerperd. It is wise to keep in mind that the Cape Boerperd Standard is a description of the “ideal” Cape Boerperd. Obviously, not every Cape Boerperd has ideal type and conformation. You will find many individuals that have good, but not “perfect” conformation, and good but not “perfect” Cape Boerperd type. These individuals may, however, be perfectly acceptable and ideally suited for your needs. Of course, it is wise to evaluate the conformational deficiencies and what impact they may have on your intended uses of your new Cape Boerperd. Again, an experienced Cape Boerperd judge, trainer or breeder as well as a good veterinarian can provide immeasurable assistance and perhaps help you avoid disappointments in the future.

Selecting the right Cape Boerperd
A horse is more than just a pretty color or a cute face. Temperament, age, size, gender, training level, and suitability for your preferred discipline are just a few of the other things to consider when you select the right Cape Boerperd for your needs.

Temperament
Most people find that of all the characteristics possessed by horses, the right temperament is paramount to an enjoyable relationship. The Cape Boerperd is known and bred for its wonderfull temperament. Their willingness to please is legendary among horse breeds. However, Cape Boerperd temperaments vary from horse to horse and it is wise for you to spend some time with your prospective purchase in order to assess its basic temperament and disposition. If you are inexperienced at assessing equine temperament, you should enlist the aid of an experienced horse person, preferably someone who has success in matching people to horses. Once you have located a Cape Boerperd that seems to fit your criteria, make arrangements with the seller to spend some time with this horse before you purchase it. Be wary of sellers who are reluctant to allow reasonable visitation.

Size
The Cape Boerperd Breed Standard calls for horses between 14.2 and 16 hands with some individuals over those heights. The Cape Boerperd is a very strong and durable horse for its size and smaller individuals are generally much more capable than horses of similar size in other breeds. It is probably wise to try horses of various sizes before you make the final determination of what size is right for you and the uses you have in mind for your Cape Boerperd. Do not dismiss the smaller Cape Boerperd for children and small adults. Some people are easily intimidated by larger horses and find the smaller Cape Boerperd quite suitable for their needs. Taller people generally prefer proportionally taller horses. Size is an important consideration, but it should probably not be the highest priority on your search criteria list.

Age
A horse reaches its physical maturity at about eight years of age. Cape Boerperd are generally first trained to ride and drive as early as two years of age. At those young ages though, their training is far from complete and their physical and mental immaturity enables only limited use. The advantage to purchasing a young Cape Boerperd is that you have more control over its handling and training than you might have with an older horse. On the other hand, the advantages to purchasing an older horse is that the bulk of its elementary training should be behind it and it may be ready to fully enjoy right away. When purchasing an older horse, you should determine what kind of handling and training history it has. It may be good, in which case your new Cape Boerperd will be ready to enjoy right away. It may, however, be unknown or even filled with events that may take some serious professional handling to overcome. If your prospect has an unknown history, it will absolutely benefit you to have a professional evaluation of that horse before you purchase it.
Do not overlook the teenage (over 10 years of age) Cape Boerperd! Cape Boerperd generally live long and useful lives and some of the best buys in the breed are the teenagers. They have training, experience, and a history of usability that makes their suitability for your needs easier to assess. Chances are a teenage Cape Boerperd that is still strong, sound, and healthy will not have tendencies for lameness or health problems. Keep in mind that the older horses most likely will have more mileage, which inevitably will take some toll. If you are considering an older horse, make the effort to determine what kind of “mileage” your prospective purchase has had, as it will help you evaluate how much stress was involved.

Gender
The question of breeding potential in your prospective purchase is important in certain situations. If the primary use of your Cape Boerperd will be breeding, you should be selecting only stock that meets the highest criteria, especially in terms of temperament, type, and conformation. If you are selecting a Cape Boerperd mare or stallion primarily for use as a performance horse, the question of breeding quality may be secondary to other criteria. The steady, reliable, and consistent temperament and performance of Cape Boerperd geldings often will make up for their lack of breeding potential and geldings generally make great choices for family recreational horses. Probably the most common fault in selecting horses is the idea that if the horse does not live up to its potential as a performance horse, one can always use it for breeding. Only Cape Boerperd stock that is intentionally selected for breeding and meets the strictest criteria in terms of Cape Boerperd temperament, type, and conformation should be used to reproduce. It is not advisable for any first time horse owner to buy a stallion.

Level of Training
Horses are never too old to learn and Cape Boerperd are wonderful at learning new things as they get older. The Cape Boerperd is a versatile breed and many individuals are very capable of learning new and different disciplines. Generally speaking, the inexperienced rider or driver combined with the inexperienced horse is not an ideal match, and is best avoided unless you have professional help that can help the two of you make it work. If the Cape Boerperd you have in mind has not reached the training level that is suitable for your skills, carefully assess whether you are willing and able to make the additional investment of money in training. It can be a very rewarding educational experience to be involved with this training, but be realistic about the time it will take to bring the horse to your skill level. Seek advice from professional trainers about what will be involved in bringing along your Cape Boerperd to the point where you can ride or drive it. And remember: when training horses, faster rarely means better.

Suitability to Discipline
The immediate goal is to buy a horse that is suitable for the discipline you plan to pursue. The Cape Boerperd that is a star as a driving horse may know little or nothing about saddle work. That will likely make it unsuitable for riding disciplines without further training. Only with the help of a very good, trained, experienced eye should you try to select a suitable horse which is not already engaged in the immediate discipline you plan to pursue.
The hallmark of the Cape Boerperd breed is its innate versatility. A Cape Boerperd with good training and handling is capable of pursuing and becoming competent at many different disciplines. Your purchasing amount may buy you much more horse for the money than some other breeds. This becomes an important consideration as the two of you grow older together. You may begin with a riding horse and decide years later that driving would be more enjoyable. The Cape Boerperd is up to the challenge. Many competitive Cape Boerperd began by excelling in one discipline and moved through several others as they aged and as their owners changed their desires and priorities. If you are purchasing an older horse, do not underestimate the value of the training; it may already have had in a discipline or two that is different from the one for which you are purchasing it. Your situation may change or you may decide to sell your Cape Boerperd at a later date. The better and more extensive it’s training, the greater enjoyment and versatility that horse has for you. And, if you need to sell your horse, your opportunities for securing a good home are far better.

Communicating with the Seller
Buyer beware. Asking questions is often your best insurance that what you see is what you are buying. Ask why the horse is for sale. The only dumb question is the one you do not ask. No seller should be reluctant to answer your questions or be evasive in his or her answers. Beware if you are unsatisfied with the answers or if the seller is not readily forthcoming.
Not all the onus is on the seller to recommend a suitable horse for you. You have to be honest in communicating your requirements and your abilities to the seller. Only then will they be able to recommend the correct horse. If they know your requirements, reputable sellers will not intentionally sell you an unsuitable Cape Boerperd.

Videos/Photos
Sellers often have photos or videos of the Cape Boerperd they have for sale and will send them to you prior to an actual visit. These are useful tools to help give you some idea of what the horses are like but be careful not to place too much importance on what you see. Sometimes what you really need to know is not in the video. Use them only as a guide. Call the seller back if the materials raise more questions. When viewing videos, remember that most televisions are not properly adjusted, particularly in horizontal and vertical adjustments, and this can present an inaccurate picture of the horses. Do not necessarily move on to another horse if the seller does not have videos or photos readily available. Good photos can be hard to come by and not everyone is equipped to make a sales video.

Competition Records
Ask for a competition record if the Cape Boerperd has been shown in competition. The younger the horse, the shorter the record will be. Do not necessarily move on to the next horse if the horse does not have a performance record. But do try to find out why it does not exist or appears to be incomplete. Ask about the level of competition. All wins are not equal. Be reasonable in your expectations of horses that have won at the local level when they move up to regional or national levels.

Care Records
Every Cape Boerperd should have some sort of record of its vaccinations and worming (Horse passport). Cape Boerperd generally are very hardy, sound horses but you should ask for a veterinary record which would list episodes of lameness and illness. Ask about those incidents if they are present. Report them to the veterinarian who may be assisting you with your purchase and ask them to evaluate their importance. Ask about stable vices. The Cape Boerperd is relatively free of stable vices, but they do exist. Some vices are relatively harmless, but others can be tough to live with and can be detrimental to the health of the horse. Fortunately, the Cape Boerperd breed has few inherent weaknesses when it comes to feet and legs. You should ask about the horse’s foot care and you may wish to speak directly with the farrier who maintains the horse’s feet.

Daily Handling
Ask about the horse’s regular daily care. The manner in which it is presently being cared for may be significantly different than what you have planned. That difference may be critical to the attitude and disposition of the horse, as well as to its physical appearance. For instance, a horse that is used to being outside 24 hour a day may change dramatically in personality if you plan to keep it stabled for long periods of time. Conversely, a horse kept stabled most of the time may react unexpectedly if you plan to keep it outside all the time. Ask how the horse gets along with other horses. What is its turnout schedule? Is it apt to be the herd boss, somewhere lower in the order, or at the bottom? Most of the time none of these positions is more or less desirable than another, but the answer may give you some more insight into the personality of the horse and help you assess how successful your plans for it may be. Ask the seller to characterize the horse’s disposition. Is it compatible with your criteria?

Ask about the horse’s training history. Who trained it, when, for how long, and in what way (i.e.saddle seat showing, show harness, carriage, hunt seat, jumping, endurance etc.)? Are the answers compatible with your plans? Speak with the person or persons who trained the horse. Often they can tell you more about the horse than the seller. Try to determine what the horse does not know. Are these things which it will have to learn before it becomes the Cape Boerperd of your dreams? If so, how much time, effort, and money will it take and is the horse likely to learn them?

Trying the Horse
Once you have spoken with the seller and had your initial questions answered, make an appointment with the seller to see and try the horse at a time that is convenient for all parties involved. If you feel unsure about your ability to assess the horse in any area—whether it be disposition, conformation, type, soundness, and/or training level, etc.—it is unwise to proceed without the help of someone who has more experience. Keep your eyes open when you visit the seller. When you first see the horse, does it appear at first glance to be the horse that was described to you? If you were told it was 15 hands and bay and it looks 14.2 hands and a different color, move on to the next seller. Try to assess the disposition of the horse, not only while it is being ridden or driven but at all times when you are together. You may learn a lot about the horse by how it has been, or is being, kept.
When trying the horse, always ask to see it being ridden or driven by its handler before you try it yourself. Never ride or drive a horse you are not positively certain can perform at least the basics for you. If you are buying a horse to “grow into” as your skills improve, take an accomplished rider or driver with you and have him or her try the horse for you. Do not rely on the seller to do this for you unless you know him or her to be reputable.

Price
Obviously the price of the horse must be within your budget. Often the asking price can be negotiated. However, do not waste your time or the seller’s time trying horses out of your price range. Find out how firm the horse’s price is before you try it. Purchase negotiations can be quite simple or quite complex depending on many factors. If the horse meets your needs but is slightly beyond what you planned to spend, in the long run it may be worth the extra money up front to own exactly the Cape Boerperd you want. You may also find that you and the seller can work out a deal that is comfortable for both of you. Sellers usually are pretty good at making adjustments in order to sell their horses. On the other hand they usually know what their horses are worth, and expecting them to drop their price significantly just because you cannot afford to pay more is unrealistic.

Payment Terms
Sometimes sellers will extend payment terms for their horses. Since a horse is a living, breathing animal, such arrangements can sometimes be quite complicated, especially if breeding options are involved. Such arrangements can and do work for both the buyer and the seller, but usually it is better to pay for the horse in full and own it outright from the signing of the purchase and sales contract.

Warranties/Guarantees
The legal intricacies of warranties and guarantees vary from sale to sale. You may wish to check with a legal adviser if you are concerned about them. Clauses that address them should be included in the purchase and sales agreement. Do not sign one until you are satisfied they are present in the contract and that they will hold up in the event of problems after the sale. Sometimes conditions or stipulations will apply to the sale of a horse. These might take the form of describing or restricting the use for which the horse is being sold, such as for breeding purposes only. The seller may know things about the horse that they may wish to stipulate prior to the sale. For instance, the seller may know the horse has a stable vice or is unable to be bred and wish to make certain you are aware of it. These types of conditions and stipulations should be specifically written into the purchase and sale agreement.

Trial Periods
Some sellers will offer trial periods during which the buyer can live with the horse to further assess its suitability and compatibility with you and its new environment. The structure of trial period agreements will vary greatly from seller to seller. Inquire about it, but don’t expect it. The terms of such an arrangement should be precisely spelled out in writing beforehand to avoid any misunderstandings. Instead of an official trial period, most sellers will gladly make reasonable time available to buyers to spend some time with the horses before actually buying them. This is a courteous gesture and you should return it by being reasonable in your requests.

The Purchase Process

The Pre-Purchase Exam
Once you have determined that the horse meets all your requirements, it is a good practice to have a veterinarian of your choosing perform a pre-purchase exam. the seller. The results of a pre-purchase exam should give you a picture of the physical condition of the horse on the day it was performed. It may give you some idea about what its life was like up to that point as your vet may find existing evidence of previous injury. It may also give you some ideas about the future soundness of the horse. Obviously your vet cannot predict the future or reconstruct the past with 100 percent accuracy, but he or she may be able to uncover warning signs of future problems based on his or her findings. It makes a lot of sense for you to be present at the pre-purchase exam, if at all possible. This will allow you to discuss findings with your veterinarian as they are made. Such discussions may save you money and will undoubtedly influence how the examination proceeds. One of the most common ways to proceed with a veterinary pre-purchase exam is to start with the rudimentary checks on the eyes, heart, lungs, teeth, and a basic soundness evaluation. Suspicious or obvious defects should be noted. Those findings may be enough to cause you to reject the horse for your purposes at that point. If you decide to investigate further, the examination should then proceed with a more in-depth analysis. Flexion tests of the limbs may indicate the existence of problems which may need further investigation. X-rays of the feet and the perhaps joints higher up the leg may be in order. Whether these are necessary will depend on the individual horse’s age and condition, your intended use, and how much maintenance you are willing to commit to in order to keep your future horse healthy and sound. If you plan to use your new Cape Boerperd for breeding, your veterinarian should examine it with that in mind. They should be able to give you fairly accurate fertility predictions. If the horse already has been used for breeding, ask the seller for any breeding records they have. Once the examination is complete and you understand the ramifications of any problems that were uncovered, it is up to you to decide if you are willing and able to live with any problems. Your veterinarian can help you determine what may be involved, but only you can determine whether you can live with them. If you feel unqualified to make the determination, rely on your veterinarian’s expert opinion or that of any experienced advisers who are helping you with your purchase decisions.

Documentation
Once you are satisfied that you have found a suitable Cape Boerperd and with the findings of the pre-purchase exam, it is time to sign the Purchase and Sale Agreement. Not every contract will be the same and sellers usually have a form they prefer. There are, however, some clauses which should be in every contract, such as the name of the owner who is selling the horse; commissions involved; the date of the transaction; the name, description, and Cape Boerperd Breeders Society registration number of the horse; the price of the horse; and how payment is to be made. Clauses about warranties, guarantees, and other stipulations as applicable to this particular horse, who will pay for the registration transfer (or who will pay for the registration if it is not already registered) should also be included. Generally speaking it is a good idea for the buyer to secure a signed registration transfer form from the seller and to send it to the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society themselves, but some sellers prefer to do it. If the Cape Boerperd is not already registered, make sure it is eligible. If you have questions about the eligibility contact the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society. In any event, how and when the official transfer and updated registration papers of the horse are to be handled should be in writing in the Purchase and Sale Agreement. Both buyer and seller should retain signed copies.

Leasing
Leasing can sometimes be a reasonable alternative to purchase and is mentioned here only because it may provide some benefits to both the owner/lessor and the lessee. This may be especially true if you are not entirely sure horse ownership is for you. It does provide a way for you to experience life with horses without the risk and commitment of outright ownership.

Conclusion
If at any time during your search for the perfect Cape Boerperd you have any questions not answered in these pages, please contact the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society. They will make every effort to answer your questions or put you in touch with someone who can. Once you have purchased your new Cape Boerperd you will be ready to join the other Cape Boerperd lovers in learning more about the breed and the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society as well as about SABAU. The Cape Boerperd Breeders Society and SABAU offers many programs for you and your Cape Boerperd and your support through membership in the Association will not only benefit you, it will help promote and preserve the wonderful Cape Boerperd!

How do I go about becoming a Breeder of Cape Boerperd.
1. Become a member of the Cape Boerperd breeders Society. Buy doing this you will also become a member of SA Studbook and receive your stud number and stud name.
2. Get a foal book from the breed society secretary
3. Buy a registered Cape Boerperd mare over the age of 3 years
4. Use or buy a registered Cape Boerperd Stallion
5. Mate the horses when the mare is in season and please remember to keep record of the mating date and the names of the horses mated. If you make use of a stallion belonging to somebody else, make sure you are given a mating certificate.
6. Have your mare tested by a vet to make sure she is pregnant.
7. 11 months later you will hopefully be a healthy foal richer.
8. Fill in the foal’s particulars in the foal book in duplicate.
8 .a Date of birth
b. Sex
c. Name of foal
d. Name of father with his registration number
e. Name of mother with her registration number
f. Markings and color of the foal.
g. Fill in the picture with the color markings as well.
h. Send the top copy of the birth notification to the secretary of the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society at P.O. Box 55, COOKHOUSE, 5820 If you have used somebody else’s stallion make sure to include the mating certificate.
i. You will get an account for the foal’s registration
j. You will get a foal book registration for your foal on payment of the fees.
k. When your foal is 3 years old it has to be inspected for the adult register of the Cape Boerperd.
l. Apply to the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society for an inspection of your foal.
m. The 3 inspectors will inspect your foal during an inspection tour. If it passes the inspection it will become a registered Cape Boerperd.


Please remember breeding is not for “sissies” so to speak. There is no foolproof way to know that you have mated the right pair of horses. Every foal is an individual and this makes breeding such a demanding and interesting job.

 

 

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